Categories
Insights

Capitalising on Search Trends and The Ordinary’s Claim To Fame

I’m sure you’re all familiar with the ingredient of the moment Niacinamide and the handful of reasons everyone is talking about and loving this ingredient. I could list out all of the fantastic benefits that adding Niacinamide into your skincare routine will provide (from minimising pores, diminish dullness, soften fine lines and wrinkles … the list goes on) but that is not why you’re here.

We’re here to take a look at the history of the search term, who is utilizing this trend and how you can get a piece of the pie.

Although Niacinamide is an ingredient that has been around for years, it is only in the last couple of years that its benefits have been widely promoted and researched. From the beginning of 2020 we can see the huge uptick of searches for the term ‘Niacinamide’ and its sustained steady growth. We’re already familiar with the increase in searches relating to skincare during the Covid pandemic, however, the trend for niacinamide began prior to this but was undoubtedly supported by the heightened focus on skincare during 2020.

Looking at the above graph you can see the large increase in searches for Niacinamide rocketing in Spring 2020, the same time we went into a global pandemic. But it wasn’t just timing that caused this sudden spike in interest in Niacinamide. It can also be largely put down to the idea that it can fix a multitude of issues, from oily skin, acne to scaring, so in fact anyone can benefit from adding Niacinamide to their skincare routine. With that in mind, given the time when skincare was a focal point for many of us at home, influencers, beauty bloggers and brands jumped on this trend and the buzz spread like wildfire.

Everyone in the beauty industry is familiar with The Ordinary and the huge impact this brand had on the market. Their 10% Niacinamide serum is just one of their key products that is like gold dust and hard to get your hands on. Their avant-garde, almost anti-marketing approach is an extremely clever angle. From a digital perspective, they secured basic SEO principles with their simple naming conventions. Naming products based on their ingredients meant that their products ranked in top positions for beauty goers looking for products with particular ingredients. With an affordable price point the demand for The Ordinary products snowballed, so it is no surprise that search trends for their products follow like for like those of the ingredient itself.

When searching for Niacinamide, The Ordinary dominate the search engine results page (SERPs) with 5/10 results linking to The Ordinary product on page 1, impressive! They are ranking for several reasons, firstly they are the brand when it comes to Niacinamide, by being affordable and having great results. As a brand they have a lot of exposure from skincare gurus and have been taken on by a multitude of stockists. Their backlink profile is extraordinary with quality domains, with an authority rating of 90+, handing them links. From March-October they have increased their backlink profile by adding a massive 4,000 additional referring domains. This will all be contributing to their success of dominating this marketplace.

As we would expect, similar trends followed for longer tail searches relating to niacinamide – ‘benefits of’, ‘how to’, ‘best products containing’ also saw a rapid increase in early 2020. To successfully rank and utilize a trend like this, it’s important to narrow down your audience by the intention of the search, where in the conversion funnel the user is and at what point is your product, or website most relevant.

For example, if the user is searching for terms like ‘how…’, ‘what…’ and ‘benefits of…’ related terms it would suggest the user is looking for more information about the ingredient and content-based blogs and guides would serve this search query best. Investing budget for these terms wouldn’t be relevant for ecommerce sites however should be considered as part of your outreach strategy. Getting featured on these content sites, best buys and round-ups will help your backlink profile, your rankings and brand awareness.

Brands investing in the conversion stage would benefit targeting and bidding on product focused keywords like ‘Niacinamide serum’, ‘Niacinamide moisturiser’ and ‘Niacinamide products’. Finding the balance between key terms with enough search volume but low competition where possible. For ecommerce brands, one of the first considerations should be ensuring you rank above your stockists, both when capitalizing on trends and from a holistic digital strategy approach.

A great way to appear on the first page without climbing the ranks (literally) is aiming to appear in a featured snippet. Common types of content include definitions, tables, steps and lists and these have higher CTRs than regular organic results so can really boost your organic performance if achieved. Optimising your content for keywords, identifying content gaps and opportunities, answer commonly asked questions within your content and monitor what your competitors are doing are just a few ways to increase your chances of appearing in what is now considered as ‘position zero’ AKA a featured snippet.

Another important consideration when creating and optimising content for key trends is the rise and importance of voice search. It is estimated that by the end of 2020, half of all searches will be performed using voice search. Questions that are spoken will return different search results than typed keywords so to capture these spoken searches, your content should incorporate more natural language patterns, include longer tail search queries and answer as many question-based searches as possible. Rather than just optimising for ‘best niacinamide serum’ consider optimising for a longer tail query like ‘what is the best niacinamide serum under £20’. 

When competition is high, and time is of the essence, another way to capitalize on the trend immediately, is running a paid media campaign.

The instant opportunity to appear at the top of the search page and the intelligent targeting opportunities available make paid advertising an avenue you simply cannot ignore. There are many variables surrounding the success of a paid campaign, what platform you choose and what a good ROI is for your business. Costs, clicks, budgets and margins all vary but managed optimally it can be a very effective space to help you stand out and capitalize on trends. A few things to consider are – do you have the right creative and do they follow best practise guidelines? Are your ads mobile optimised? And is your shopping feed set up correctly to serve google shopping?

Being aware of new and current search trends is an important way to keep up with your customers and stay ahead of your competitors. Knowing these trends is one thing, making the most of them is another.  

If you need pointing in the direction of tools to aid researching trending topics, we have a blog post listing a series of free and paid tools to uncover behavioural changes, here.

Categories
Insights

Is skincare still booming?

In May we uncovered the huge surges of interest in skincare online, we called it “COVID’s skincare boom” and you can read all about it here. But how does it look so many months later? Are the trends still pointing towards a skincare boom? Keep reading to find out.

Skincare topic in general.

Google Trends ‘skin care’ graph for the last 12 months

As analysed in May, the surge in skin care searches online began late-March, increasing 100% in terms of topic popularity (from 50 to 100). And although there has been a small decrease in trending searches for skin care (-30%) since the end of May, the level is still much greater than the average, evidencing skin care is still very much a trending topic.

When analysisng 371 skin care keywords, for example ‘skin care products’ and ‘beauty skin care’, the year-on-year search trend shows a whopping +60% search increase for these related search terms in August (2020 v 19). We also know that for most of the keywords analysed, the cost-per-click is hovering around the £1.50 mark.

What does this mean for marketers?

Trending topics are increased opportunities for brands to get their products noticed, shopped and purchased.

For example, with sound technical and onsite SEO and an SEO strategy that targets a handful of the 371 keywords analysed – or on the flip side – a PPC strategy that again targets the same keywords, the increased number of searches provide more opportunities for your brand/products to be visible in the search results.

However, the ‘skin care’ keywords analysed are incredibly broad with little purchase intent, therefore ranking for them organically could be a challenge. So let’s dig a little deeper…

Skin conditions. The search trends.

Likely to be the research phase of a buyer journey, an increase in skin condition searches indicates consumers are interested in learning about their skin. Again, there’s likely little purchase intent here, but if researching skin conditions is a growing trend, it suggests ingredient/product searches are too!

Dry skin

We reported in May that searches for dry skin followed a seasonal trend (repeating annual patterns), however, ‘dry skin’ search volumes had peaked at its highest in Apr/May of this year; around 33% of an increase in popularity. What’s happened since then, isn’t very exciting at all.

There has been a dramatic fall in the volume of searches which has led to the ‘dry skin’ trend falling back to its usual seasonal state which is repeated annually, but there’s still a slightly greater search volume of dry skin keyword as compared with August last year (+20% 2020 v 19).

Google Trends ‘dry skin’ graph over 5 years

Red skin (or rosacea)

These keywords follow the same trend as ‘dry skin’; a soar in popularity in Apr/May and a decline back towards average in early Jul, though still remaining ever so slightly above average when compared with last year at 417k topic searches, an increase of 31% (Aug 2020 v 19)

Oily skin

It appears oily skin is still having a moment.

Google Trends ‘oily skin’ graph over 2 years

With no evidence of seasonality, since early April ‘oily skin’ has been a very popular search term and remains a trending keyword and topic. The latest stats show a +50% increase in keyword searches and a whopping +75% increase in oily skin topic searches in comparison to August last year.

If your products target consumers with oily skin, consider these numbers in your strategy.

Acne, spots and blackheads

These common skin conditions (including pores!) have minor seasonality as evidenced in the graph with trends spiking around Jun/Jul, so it is abnormal to have such large surges in early April that have continued into September. Especially spots (yellow) and acne (blue) which have the greatest search volumes.

Google Trends (from L>R) ‘acne’, ‘blackheads’, ‘spots’ and ‘pores’ graph over 2 years

Product search trends.

Does the slight increase in skin condition searches still stipulate growth in general product searches, too?

These latest figures compare August 2020 v 2019.


Again (similar to our May report), we are seeing a greater level of growth for products in comparison to the skin condition the product is associated with. However, these figures, whilst still high in comparison YoY (year-on0year), have dropped on average -36% since April.

From a small survey carried out internally, people are less worried about how they appear on video calls, and whilst they welcomed the opportunity to go makeup-less and care for their skin in a bid to return to the office blemish-free back in early April, those cares have slowly diminished as lockdown continues and there’s no “returning to the office” on the horizon.

Search trends of skincare brands.


In comparison to May’s COVID report, there have been many fluctuations. A large percentage of the brands listed experienced an 80% increase in branded search volume four months ago, with only three brands seeing no change/decrease.

The stats from August show x17 brands have seen no change or a decrease in their branded search volume in comparison YoY.

But it’s not all bad, many brands are still experiencing over a 20% increase of branded search volume YoY, which is a big difference when the early figures are in the ten-thousands. Again, this could be for many reasons. For example, increased marketing spend, or new product launches whereby brand awareness plays a role. Either way, having this volume of branded searches is pivotal for growth.

How to take advantage of the still high levels of skincare searches?

  1. Make sure you have a clear and easy method for funneling consumers through from browsing to purchasing.
  2. Use automated bidding on PPC campaigns to make sure that your ads are adapting to ever-changing browsing habits.
  3. Ensure that your shopping feed is set up correctly – there are many instances of products appearing in shopping ads that are out of stock or not available in certain areas.
  4. Update your body ad copy to reflect what is in stock or available for quick delivery, as this is a key concern for people when shopping. 
  5. Social media browsing is up and costs for ads are down, so now is a great time to drive further traffic to your website and engage with users.
Categories
Insights

The Covid Effect: Skincare’s Boom

Whilst the current situation has created mass upheaval to our daily lives, for some industries the disruption has been a positive one. We’ve analysed search trends within the Skincare industry to uncover how Lockdown has brought about a skincare boom.

Skin Conditions Search Trends

Whether it’s because we’re being confined to an indoor space for longer than we’re used to which is adversely affecting our skin, or perhaps because video conferencing means we’re looking at ourselves more than ever before, search trends show that we’re more interested in our skin.

Whilst many skincare terms have shown a sustained growth of interest, the current situation has meant that many search terms are seeing their highest ever search volumes. Using Google Trends and the SEO Monitor COVID19 Trends tool, we’ve analysed a range of keyword themes in the skincare industry.

Dry Skin

The 5 year Google Trends graph below shows that the search term ‘Dry Skin’ usually peaks every year around February/March time. However April this year has been the most popular the term has ever been.

Red Skin

Whilst there is less consistent seasonality to the search term ‘Red Skin’ when compared to ‘Dry Skin’ there are clear spikes in interest around this (April/May) time of year anyway. However, interest is at its highest ever.

Oily Skin

Whilst not at the same volume as ‘Dry Skin’, ‘Oily Skin’ has seen a huge 86% YoY increase in searches.

Acne

Despite Acne showing no clear seasonal trends, the 83% growth in the search term is a considerable increase caused by the lockdown.

Blackheads

The 5 year search trend for ‘Blackheads’ shows only small growth, but has jumped up by 22% last month.

Skincare Products Search Trends

The growing interest in skin concerns is matched by a growth in searches for products to alleviate them.


The rate of the growth in these terms is considerable and in some cases, exceeds the rate of growth of the skin condition that the product is associated with. For example, the rate of growth for Moisturiser was 122% and for Face Cream, a massive 174% with the search volume for Dry Skin growing 83%.

So does this mean that we’ll be paying more attention to our skin after the lock down?

General Interest in Skincare since Lockdown

Skin Care Routine

Nothing demonstrates the boom in interest in skincare more than the search term ‘Skin Care Routine’ which shows an astonishing 5x growth YoY.

The rate of the growth in these terms is considerable and in some cases, exceeds the rate of growth of the skin condition that the product is associated with. For example, the rate of growth for Moisturiser was 122% and for Face Cream, a massive 174% with the search volume for Dry Skin growing 83%.

So does this mean that we’ll be paying more attention to our skin after the lock down?

General Interest in Skincare since Lockdown

Skin Care Routine

Nothing demonstrates the boom in interest in skincare more than the search term ‘Skin Care Routine’ which shows an astonishing 5x growth YoY.

Interestingly, whilst Google trends shows that some terms may have hit their peak in the mid/end of April, the ‘skin routine’ keyword has shown that interest has grown further into the lockdown.

Skin Care For Men

Whilst men’s cosmetics terms have been growing over time, the current situation hasn’t made the ‘Skin Care For Men’ search term more popular than its seasonal peak at Christmas time. However, the YoY difference shows 4x growth in the search term for this period.

Niacinamide

This search term is for ‘Niacinamide’, a specific type of vitamin that a number of creams and serums have as a key ingredient.

4x YoY growth shows a huge increase into the ingredients of products, perhaps indicating that the skin care consumer is taking a much more research focussed approach to choosing products for particular skin conditions.

Search Trends of Skincare Brands

The vast majority of brands have seen increases in search volume, with some seeing ‘unprecedented’ YoY growth.


Whilst most brands are benefitting from considerable growth, the nearly 400% growth for ‘The Ordinary’ stands out amongst the top searched for skin care brands.

There are likely to be a number of reasons for this, but it certainly shows the importance of brand building and brand advertising. The Ordinary have won a multitude of awards which are clearly displayed on their site and with a low price point, they have become incredibly attractive to many people who are perhaps exploring skincare in a way they never did before.

What Does This Mean For Marketers?

It’s clear that the skin care industry is going through a boom and it’s essential for marketers to act now whilst there is substantially higher than normal search volume and high purchase intent.

Luckily, we’ve already written an article that details how eCommerce habits have changed under lockdown, and offered some advice which certainly is relevant here. In a nutshell:

  1. Ensure that you’re using automated bidding on PPC campaigns to make sure that your ads are adapting to ever changing browsing habits.
  2. Ensure that your shopping feed is set up correctly – there are many instances of products appearing in shopping ads that are out of stock or not available in certain areas.
  3. Update your body copy and ad copy to reflect what is in stock or available for quick delivery, as this is a key concern for people when shopping. 
  4. Social media browsing is up and costs for ads are down, so now is a great time to drive further traffic to your website and engage with users.

Do you work in the skincare industry?

We’ve created a comprehensive guide into the skincare industry covering the consumer, the search landscape and have also included some helpful SEO tips that can help you rank for your target keywords. If you’d like this guide then please get in touch at info@libertymarketing.co.uk 

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Get Access

To download the white paper, please enter your email address:

This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.