Three Simple Mistakes to Avoid in Beauty Marketing

- 7 minute read
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Digital Content Specialist​

Gemma Elgar is a Digital Content Specialist at Foundation where she creates and executes content strategies, including site copy, blog content, and more. She also conducts social media campaigns for our clients, and has spoken on a panel about creating sensitive campaigns for niche audiences.

To create a strong digital marketing strategy for your beauty brand, every piece of the puzzle needs to be strong individually. This means knowing and avoiding the most common and most damaging mistakes that get made in each element of digital marketing.

It’s a delicate balancing act, but it’s important to get it right. Smaller brands, in particular, can’t afford to make mistakes when competing against industry giants. That’s where we come in.

At Foundation, we know what makes a successful beauty marketing strategy. Here, we’ll explain the three most common mistakes that get made in SEO, content, PR, and PPC, and what those mistakes could cost your business.

The Top Mistakes to Avoid in SEO Marketing

1. Neglecting Mobile

For most brands, mobile searches account for more than half of their site traffic, so you need to be sure you’re optimising for mobile as much as, if not more than, desktop.

This is incredibly important from a user experience perspective, but it’s also important in terms of SERP rankings. Google and other search engines are able to recognise whether a site is mobile-friendly, so your site will be penalised if it isn’t. 

The same goes for slow-loading pages, which are a common fault among neglected mobile sites. As with desktop sites, the more attention and TLC you give your mobile site, the more of an effect you’ll see.

2. Keyword Cannibalisation

It can be tempting to create multiple pages and blogs for one topic, cramming as many keywords as possible into each one. But quantity does not equal quality. 

You might actually be causing more damage to your site by doing this, as search engines can get confused by keyword stuffing. Make sure that each page on your site has a particular keyword focus to avoid cannibalisation. 

For example, if you’ve got a site page dedicated to an ingredient like niacinamide, avoid answering too many niacinamide-based questions on other pages, such as product pages where niacinamide is an ingredient. 

We know it’s tempting and seems like you could cover more content ground, but you’re better off instead linking to your niacinamide page. This lowers your risk of cannibalisation but also helps with internal linking and creates an opportunity to improve your click-through rate.

If your website has been around for a while, make sure to review it for existing copy on a topic before writing new or you could end up competing with yourself for valuable real estate on Google results pages.

3. Being Impatient

Patience is key when working in SEO. You’re unlikely to ever see drastic overnight changes in your rankings when you implement a new piece of content. Instead, set realistic expectations and examples with the help of a specialist team

When it comes to a proper SEO strategy, it can take a little while to see results. That’s why people tend to lose motivation, but it’s important to persist to reap the real rewards. 

If you are looking for instant results, you may like to consider paid advertising. However, be aware that PPC traffic tends to end up costing more than organic in the long-run.

Things to Avoid in Content Marketing

1. Skipping Meta Content

Meta descriptions, title tags, and alternative text to images are all vital, both for reader accessibility, helping click through rates and improve rankings on SERPs. 

While meta descriptions aren’t as vital for rankings as they once were, meta descriptions help with engagement, bounce rate and click through rates, which Google does consider an important part of its ranking criteria. Ensure that your meta content is within the character count, explains the page content for relevancy and has a call to action to entice a click. Don’t underestimate the bits of content that don’t necessarily get seen!

2. The Wrong Type of Content

There’s no point in creating content for the sake of ranking. After all, there is little benefit to ranking for an irrelevant topic that doesn’t link directly back to your brand. Of course, it’s good to rank, but if it isn’t relevant to your audience, it won’t perform well. 

This is because you’re unlikely to be seen as an authoritative voice on the topic, both by your audience and by Google’s EEAT guidelines, meaning your post is likely to be penalised in SERPs.

It’s easy, for example, to want to rank for makeup terms if you’re running a skincare brand. But, if your audience is searching for makeup terms, will they find what they need in the bulk of your site? If the answer is no, reconsider whether you should be writing about it.

3. Being Inconsistent

An inconsistent pace of uploading makes your brand look like it’s lacking structure. Blog posts should be uploaded at equal intervals, and newsletters published regularly and with a consistent layout. Planning out and then uploading content at regular intervals improves the trustworthiness of your brand.

You can also stay relevant by upcycling old blog content so your previous posts don’t show up as outdated. Updating your audience regularly on the latest news is also a great way to re-engage with your audience and create a thriving back-and-forth conversation; link your social media to your website where possible to encourage that sense of regular community. 

Consider embedding an Instagram feed of tagged images on your site home page, showcasing skincare before-and-afters and product demonstrations – it’s important to make all content on the site as relevant and recent as possible.

Common Mistakes in PR Beauty Marketing

1. Rushing a Story

It’s easy to be over-eager with a PR campaign and try to push the word out before the rest of your operations are ready for it. If you do this, the inconsistencies could reflect badly on your brand, and in extreme cases you could end up in hot water for incorrect advertising.

Make sure everything is in line before sending out a press release or contacting journalists. Spend time developing your brand internally first, so that when you start embracing the public you know exactly who and what you’re representing in your PR.

Read more: The Dos and Don’ts of Digital PR: Beauty and Wellness Edition

2. Only Targeting Big Media

It’s great to aim for big-name publications when you’re sending out your press releases, but it’s important to build up to them through smaller publishers. The big names aren’t going to validate your brand if you haven’t proven yourself yet to indie publishers, so it’s best to start small.

Instead of aiming straight for Cosmo and Vogue, consider presenting your story for publications like Polychrome and BUST magazine.

While high DR sites are important, the number of referring domains are too. A healthy mix of DRs and links from a variety of different sites is best.

3. Lack of Personalisation

Personalisation goes a long way when journalists receive so many regular requests. Generalising the reader can come across as clinical, and when journalists receive dozens, or even hundreds of emails in a day, yours needs to stand out.

Something as simple as using the recipient’s name at the start of the email, or having a more casual tone throughout, can set you apart.

What to Avoid in PPC

1. Only Targeting New Audiences

It’s great to try to spread the word about your brand and bring in new customers, but remember to give some love to your returning customers, too. This might be people who have bought from you before or people who have searched your brand’s name previously.

In fact, some of the best people to target are those who have visited your site before but have not completed their order at checkout. These customers already have your brand at the forefront of their minds, so a little extra push from your PPC team could well be enough to get them to convert.

2. Always Aiming to Outbid Your Competitors

Of course everyone wants their brand to rank in the top position on SERPs, but this position is elusive and hard to achieve. While we’ll always aim to outrank your competitors, its unrealistic to expect to always outbid them, particularly for some of the top non-branded terms. 

Focusing on improving search impression share will actually be more impactful for your PPC strategy. The greater impression share you have, the more chances you have of getting the click.

3. Not Using Negative Keywords

Google negative keywords is a great way to fine-tune your audience. Essentially, it allows you to veto your brand appearing for certain search terms. For example, if you’re advertising a facemask product, you could enter words like ‘surgical’ and ‘Covid-19’ into your Google negative keywords to stop your page appearing for the wrong type of face mask.

This is an easy and effective way of finessing the context in which your brand is seen, giving you better control over your brand’s image and it stops wasting budget.

Working with Experts at Foundation

Your best option for a seamless, all-around campaign that doesn’t fall into any of the traps above is to employ a specialised digital marketing agency, like us at Foundation.We can work with you to create a digital strategy that complements your brand and integrates your KPIs. Get in touch with us today to find out how.

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